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What’s Happening to Apache AH-64 Attack Helicopters? Four Crashes in Two Months

In just a span of two months, four Apache AH-64 attack helicopters operated by the Army National Guard and the United States Army have crashed, killing two  of its crews.

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(DEFENCE SECURITY ASIA) — In just a span of two months, four Apache AH-64 attack helicopters operated by the Army National Guard and the United States Army have crashed, killing two  of its crews.

The most recent mishap involving these armed helicopters occurred at Fort Carson, Colorado, United States, just a few days ago.

The unfortunate Apache helicopter was operated by the 4th Combat Aviation Brigade of the United States Army during a routine training flight, resulting in minor injuries to the pilot and gunner.

Consequently, authorities at Fort Carson have suspended all aircraft flights, including AH-64 Apache helicopters until investigations into the incident are completed.

A few days prior to this recent incident, another AH-64E Apache attack helicopter, operated by the 16th Combat Aviation Brigade of the United States Army, also encountered an accident during routine training flight at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington State.

This incident resulted in injuries to both the pilot and gunner of the attack helicopter.

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 Apache AH-64 Attack Helicopter Crashed in Utah, recently

 

As of now, the unfortunate pilot and gunner are receiving treatment at local hospitals and are reported to be in stable condition.

Both accidents involving AH-64 attack helicopters operated by the United States Army occurred after two similar helicopters also crashed in February.

The two AH-64D attack helicopters involved in the February accidents were operated by the Army National Guard of the United States.

The causes of both accidents involving the National Guard-operated attack helicopters are still under investigation.

The first accident involved an AH-64D National Guard helicopter from Utah, which crashed on February 13th at the South Valley Regional Airport in West Jordan, resulting in injuries to both crew members.

The second accident involved an AH-64D attack helicopter operated by the Mississippi National Guard, which crashed in the town of Booneville in northern Utah on February 23rd.

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This incident resulted in the tragic deaths of both helicopter crew members, Warrant Officer Bryan Andrew and Warrant Officer Derek Joshua.

On February 27th, the National Guard announced the suspension of all Apache attack helicopter operations.

Up until 2020, the United States Army and its National Guard operated approximately 700 AH-64 Apache attack helicopters for active operations both domestically and internationally.

The United States Army began operating armed Apache helicopters in 1984, nearly four decades ago.

Last year, the United States Army announced an increase in issues related to electrical power generator failures, which could lead to smoke accumulation in the cockpit of these armed helicopters.

However, as of now, there is no indication that the recent crashes involving these four latest Apache AH-64 attack helicopters are related to issues stemming from the electrical generator. — DSA

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